England

Cards from far off lands and bygone days!

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 9:29 am  

A pack produced and published by British Museum Connection, London and dated 1995.
This unique pack of playing cards has been created for the British Museum. Each suit reflects a different aspect of the splendid collections of the museum. The illustrations by Frances Button have all been derived from actual exhibits in the Egyptian,Greek,Assyrian and Medieval Departments. The jokers are of the Piltdown man discovered in 1912 and was believed to prove that prehistoric man was intelligent and in 1955 it was proven to be a hoax.
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The Diamonds from the Medieval period are from the Lewis Chessmen that was discovered in 1831 on the Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides . They were carved from Walrus ivory in Britain or Scandinavia during the mid to late 12th century.
The Spades from the Assyrian department show the King to be Ashurnasirpal II, King of Assyria. The Queen is The Consort of Ashurbanipal (no name mentioned) The jack shows an Assyrian Archer,hunt attendant to the King and the ace shows an Assyrian Palace.
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The Clubs from Ancient Egypt has Osiris, ruler of the underworld, consort of Isis and father of Horus as King, The queen shown is Ankhnesenferibra, the Jack shows Paynedjem II,The high priest of Amun and the Ace show a table of offerings to the God Osiris.
And the Hearts from Greece show Zeus king of all the Gods, the Queen shows Athena, the daughter of Zeus and Metis and the Jack shows Herakles was the son of Zeus and the mortal woman Alkmene. The Ace shows two chariot horse.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Tue Feb 17, 2015 9:53 am  

A couple more Courts from various British manufacturers.First up Universal Playing Card Co.
Alf Cooke began in Playing card production along with a few other printers with "British Playing Card Ltd" which lasted from 1920-1925, Its unknown what happened but in 1925 Alf cooke set out on his own and set up the Universal playing card company which lasted until the Waddingtons take over in 1970. Alf Cooke used one standard Ace with a few variations(as with most british companies they also produced a few Special aces) This Ace is the first variation of their standard ace dated 1925-1955.
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Next up Marsden,Son & Hall. A branch of the Imperial Tobacco company responsible for making Cigarette & cigar cartons and also cigarette cards that were included inside various packets. In the early 1930`s for a very short time (1932-1934) they began producing Playing Cards along with Waddingtons & De La Rue to help out with the huge demand of the Wills Scheme.Along with the Full-sized & Parience size cards for the Wills Scheme they also produced a few Advertising decks for various W.D & H.O. Wills products.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 8:13 am  

A festive pack from Waddingtons dated 1980. The pack came in a clear plastic box.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 8:42 am  

The 2006 Installation Pack from The worshipful company of Playing Card makers titled The Time & Space Project.
The backs were designed by Brad Baker,a specialist playing card illustrator. The pack was printed by Richard Edward Ltd in London and there were 350 Packs produced.
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The city of London livery company was granted its charter in 1628 by Charles I to protect the English manufacturers of playing cards from overseas suppliers and to regulate the trade in London and its environs. Since 1882 the company has issued a pack of cards annually to celebrate the election and installation of the new master.
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The faces of the cards reproduce a pack published in about 1828 which was designed by Charles Hodges of Portman Square, London. The suits correspond to the four seasons personified as Aces, The court cards depict Roman Gods and Goddesses, whilst the numeric cards represent constellations with the higher numerals featuring the twelve signs of the zodiac. This pack contains three Ace of spades, one being part of the original pack, a second being a "Old Frizzle" duty Ace of Stopforth & sons The original makers of Hodges`s pack and the third shows the master`s portrait and names of wardens and clerk in accordance with company traditions.No jokers existed in the original pack, but two have been added, featuring John Flamsteed the first Astronomer royal, and John Harrison the clockmaker who invented the most famous watch ever made.
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The Card back design has been chosen to commemorate the Time & Space project at the Royal observatory, home of Greenwich Mean Time and the Prime Meridan line, It is official starting point of each new day,year and millennium. The Observatory was originally founded by Charles II in 1675 to improve navigation at sea and "Find the so much desired longitude of places" by astronomical means. However the solution to the problem of longitude was found to rely equally on the measurement of time as well as astronomy.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 8:47 am  

A Venice-Simplon Orient Express double pack by waddingtons dated 1990.the set came in a clear plastic box.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -Jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby volantangel » Wed Feb 25, 2015 8:50 am  

The 2006 installation deck is an absolutely stunning deck of cards, if only the back design matched the faces stylistically. That's the weakest part of this deck, faces are beautiful !
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 9:12 am  

volantangel wrote:The 2006 installation deck is an absolutely stunning deck of cards, if only the back design matched the faces stylistically. That's the weakest part of this deck, faces are beautiful !


Hi Volantangel.
Yes that the trouble with reproduction packs :roll: :roll: oh well what can you do eh? :lol:
The WCPCM produced a few repo pack from 2003-2012 which are all pretty hard to find especially at a reasonable price. the one from 2003 which has a reproduction of the Mediaeval pack made by New York Consolidated Card Co in 1897 is one i`m very interested in and am on the look out for :drool: ... the last one i seen on e-bay sold for £120....oh well you never know eh.
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Re: England

Unread postby dazzleguts » Wed Feb 25, 2015 12:03 pm  

Same with the scenic aces deck I posted to the Netherlands thread. Sometimes the faces are so beautiful, and/or interesting, that the back can be tolerated. Though I hope to find a Scenic Aces with a better back.

I was going to ask why it was called an Installation deck, but then realized it featured an Observatory. :ugthink:

I will post a reproduction 1700s deck to the Germany thread later today that I think is related to this one.
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Re: England

Unread postby ecNate » Wed Feb 25, 2015 12:52 pm  

That Time & Space deck is awesome!
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:26 pm  

@ ecNate... Yeah so glad you like it :D

@ Dazzelguts...The sets are called installation packs because they are handed out to members of the company at their annual dinner when they "Install" a new Master....Cant` wait to see the German deck.
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sun Apr 12, 2015 2:06 am  

A facsimile of a deck first published in 1679 titled Knavery of the Rump containing satirical cards portraying Oliver Cromwells government.The pack was produced by Harry Margary in association with Guildhall Library,London in 1978.
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Only three complete packs of these cards are known to have survived ,two in Great Britain and one in the U.S.A. The pack reproduced here is the only one with the title card giving the name of the pack which is often simply referred to as the Rump Parliament Pack.
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The illustrations on the cards, with their stongly protagonist captions provide, apart from their familiar sentiments of disapproval, a rare visual impression of the times. The satirical element involves presenting the personalities in various unfamiliar occupations and costumes, and we see not only the military warring factions, but the humbler souls of town and countryside in traditional dress. The pack is, in fact, a valuable witness to a variety of aspects of mid 17th-century society.
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Francis Barlow was responsible for designs which were incorporated in other packs whose sentiments were also directed against the Kings enemies. "The Horrid Popish Plot", published in the same year as "The Knavery of the Rump", was extremely popular and ran to many editions. It is interesing, in view of the number of surviving examples of the "Horrid Popish Plot" (in the region of 50) how much more attractive it was to the public of the day.The current scandal must have been more titillating than the trials of the past, although as a record of history, both social and political. It would seem that by 1679 the commonwealth was, to the general public, a dead issue.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sun Apr 12, 2015 2:27 am  

A facsimile of a pack published in 1707 titled Marlborough`s Victories. This pack was produced by Harry Margary in 1972.
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This pack are pictorially one of the most elaborately engraved sets of playing cards ever issued, and demonstrate fully the adulation at the time accorded to the first Duke of Marlborough during his overseas campaigns. Although primarily intended as a compliment to his Grace`s successes, the pack deals with a variety of European political issues and includes several portraits of royalty connected with the campaigns.
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The Spade suit comprises almost entirely a series of savage, not to mention scurrilous attacks upon the French King Louis XIV :but it is on the 6 of Clubs that an Amazonic "Anna Major" is shown thrashing a fallen "Ludovicus Magnus". This card is captioned "The medal struck at Utrecht upon ye Victorie obtain`d at Ramelies".The pack also provides an interesting sidelight on the fall of the Duke of Marlborough from royal and public favour.
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It has not yet been discovered who was the original publisher of the cards, but nearly every pack of pictorial cards since the 1670`s except those with marked political involvement were reprinted or re-issued by a Fleet street stationer, John Lenthall from about 1710 onward. From the lack of Tax stamp on surviving packs no copy of "Marlborough`s Victories" is known to have been sold after 1711, the year of his dismissal from his offices. The pack provides, therefore, a fine illustration of the eternal theme of the fickle treatment of their heroes and favorites by royalty and subjects alike.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby volantangel » Sun Apr 12, 2015 2:42 am  

Jase are the back of these decks blank ?
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sun Apr 12, 2015 2:58 am  

A facsimile of a deck first published in 1720 titled "South Sea Bubble" This pack was produced in 1972 by Harry Margary.
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This is the rarer of 2 packs of playing cards published by Thomas Bowles dealing with the financial scandals and faulty projects epitomised by the bursting of the South Sea Bubble.The cards provide a unique contemporary record of the feverish activities of traders in stock, by depicting in cartoon from a series of domestic situations which, although doubtless somewhat exaggerated, represented the atmosphere of the time.
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Extensive use is made of the balloon technique for reporting the speech of those portrayed and each card has a pithy, not to say in several instances coarse, verse describing the situation. The cards offer not only a marvellous record of fashions of dress of the period but also commentary upon those who were tempted and fell as a result of the apparent Gold rush. The difference that wealth made to the marriage market is dwelt upon at length: and one of the many interesting sidelights on history disclosed by this pack (of which only 3 complete sets are known) is that the status symbol most generally craved by the newly rich was as now a vehicle off transport: at that time a coach.
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The second Bowles pack was rather different in Character, giving a cleverly described satirical view on each card of various projects and bubbles of the time. This pack retained its popularity and the Bowles family continued publishing it for many years. The present pack, however, must have appeared dated to the mid 18th century English and did not have the same long life; a full appreciation of the intimate life of Londomers of 1720 which is depicted on its cards is left to present-day eyes.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sun Apr 12, 2015 3:03 am  

volantangel wrote:Jase are the back of these decks blank ?


Hiya Volantangel :D was busy writing up the Bubble cards when you posted... The answer is yes all three Harry Margary packs have all got blank backs.
Thanks for checking them out :D
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Re: England

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sun Apr 12, 2015 7:53 pm  

It's great how the characters in the South Sea Bubble cards are actually holding their word balloons in their hands. I wonder if that's the first use of word balloons. I know it's the first stock market crash.

Is the "Horrid Popish Plot" the same as the "Meal Tub Plot"? I have a Meal Tub facsimile but it's made by H. & V. Wayland and doesn't have the same quality as Harry Margery.

Thanks for putting these up Jase :) .
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:12 am  

dazzleguts wrote:Is the "Horrid Popish Plot" the same as the "Meal Tub Plot"? I have a Meal Tub facsimile but it's made by H. & V. Wayland and doesn't have the same quality as Harry Margery.


Hiya Dazzelguts :D
These are two different packs. To my knowledge there are at least four "Plot" Packs but may be more, The one`s that i know of are "All the Popish Plots" this pack includes many plots including the Gunpowder Plot, Dr Parry`s plot against Queen Elizabeth I and the Titus Oates plot. The second Pack is "The Horrid popish plot" or just "popish plot" it is the most popular of the anti-catholic packs and deals primarily with the Titus Oates Plot, "The meal tub plot" pack made around the same time as the first two packs (1678-80) dealt with an alleged plot found in a meal tub organised by Mme Cellier,together with Thomas Dangerfield ,the plot was against the Roman catholic Duke of York.and the last pack "the rye house plot" which directed its wrath at the old Roundhead enemy and the plot was to murder the Royal twins on their way to Newmarket Races, this plot took place in 1683.
There are also at least four different "Bubble" packs that i know of all dating from 1720, Two English packs titled "All the bubbles" which features different spurious inventions that people could invest in. "south sea bubble" where the public was intentionally misled into investing into the company by unscrupulous directors. the other two packs are Dutch packs both satirizing the disastrous Mississippi scheme projected in France, these packs are called "Kaart spel van momus naar de Nieuwste Mode" & "Windkaart op de Windbegoti van`t Isar".
Hope this information helps you :D
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sat May 02, 2015 7:04 am  

The Cartoonist Pack, Made by Carta Mundi dated 1980.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: England

Unread postby Slavich » Sat May 02, 2015 10:09 am  

Jock1971 wrote:The Cartoonist Pack, Made by Carta Mundi dated 1980.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-


I love this deck. Bought one a couple of weeks ago :)

Thanks for posting the pics.
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Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Fri May 15, 2015 8:54 am  

A facsimile of "Morden`s Playing cards" first published in 1676, published by Harry Margary in 1972.
This most interesting pack, of which only one complete pack with the two preliminary cards is thought to exist, forms a small Atlas of England and Wales. As such, it is the first Atlas to indicate roads.
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The set is entered in the Term Catalogue for easter 1676 as: "The 52 Countries (sic) of England and Wales, described in a pack of cards.....Sold by Robert Morden at the Atlas in Cornhill, will. Berry at the Globe in the Strand, Robert Green in Budge Row, and George Minikin at the King`s Head in St. Martin`s"
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The selection of the counties for the suits is described in the preliminary card, headed - "The explanation of these cards". The Esq. Ogilby, referred to, is the John Ogilby who in the previous year published his Britannia, which described the routes of 100 roads in Britain.
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The King depicted on the cards is Charles II and the Queen, his wife, Catherine of Braganza. The main part of the cards was printed from engraved copper plates, with the suit marks being later applied by stencil. The cards were clearly designed to give instruction to the young, rather than serious play. There were other similar instructional packs of cards published at about the same time covering, amongst other subjects, Astronomy, Geography, Heraldry and History.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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