England

Cards from far off lands and bygone days!

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Fri May 23, 2014 4:31 pm  

First up Diamonds by Anna Orton using Lino cuts and hand printing
IMG_0005.jpg

Next Spades by Susanne Lund Pangrazio using pencil drawing
IMG_0008.jpg

next the Hearts by Kathryn Briggs using watercolours and tea
IMG_0006.jpg

and finally the Clubs by Nicole Bennett using Collage
IMG_0007.jpg


Thank`s for looking :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sat May 24, 2014 5:17 pm  

I love seeing experimentation with card faces like this and would probably pick up this deck if it crossed my immediate path, but, much as I like the art decks, I think they should be more cohesive.

Perhaps if there was red used in the spades suit, like it is throughout the rest, or used only in the red suits, then it would jibe more. The diamonds are too bold and graphic compared to the more sketchy looks of the rest. A common method of showing the indices would help too.

In vintage decks the Jeu de Marseille and Rixdorfer work very well, despite multiple artists contributing, because they were part of strong art movements at the time - giving them a shared visual language. Also they either all stuck to the same medium (Rixdorfer), or had one artist convert everyone else's sketches into the graphics used (Marseille).

Jeu de Marseille: http://www.wopc.co.uk/france/grimaud/le-jeu-de-marseille.html

Rixdorfer: http://www.endebrock.de/coll/pages/d2015.html
Worldwide Time Machine

"Cards from far off lands and bygone days!"
User avatar
dazzleguts
Moderator
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1491
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:32 pm
Country: Canada (ca)
Has thanked: 191 times
Been thanked: 132 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Jun 04, 2014 1:04 pm  

dazzleguts wrote:I love seeing experimentation with card faces like this and would probably pick up this deck if it crossed my immediate path, but, much as I like the art decks, I think they should be more cohesive.

Hi Dazzleguts, :D i agree with you the deck should be more cohesive overall, more interaction between the artists could have made this deck very nice, although said that each suit has their merits and bad points i think.
Thanks for the links ,the jeu de Marseille looks cool very Picaso. I love the Rixdorfer deck,what you said about the effect of artists collaborating yet still doing their own thing really shows on this deck, Very nice will look out for it :D
"Forest" Playing Cards designed by Yama Zhang.
I found this deck on Etsy.com, Very expensive at £18. This pack is made up Plastic cards,There is an option for cardstock but you need to message her as she plans to sell only 50 of the card ones.
IMG_0001.jpg

The postage on these cards is £2 local and £5 international. The cards are cellophane wrapped and comes in a clear plastic box with a ripple effect down the sides. My deck was wrapped in bubblewrap ,then placed in a cardboard box then put in a Jiffy envelope and sent to me.
IMG_0002.jpg

The number cards is what drew me to this deck,the courts could be better, but nice all the same nothing really bad. The back is one way ,to be honest whichever way you look at it it looks upright to my eyes :lol:
IMG_0003.jpg

Thought i`d show these cards because the young lady who designed the deck is pretty local ,about a half hour drive away. i got a note with the cards saying i was her first customer on etsy :D with that price i`m not suprised :lol: i got a couple of cheap waddingtons to even the score out a bit :D
IMG_0004.jpg

Thanks for looking at the cards and if you like what you see check out Yama`s shop on Etsy.com
-Jase- :D
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby dazzleguts » Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:31 pm  

I like the solidity of the owl joker. It's better than the more tentative feel of the court cards. Nice details in the pip cards, and I like the way the forest scene back can be read from either end. It's not mirrored but it's not really one-way either.

If I spot a Rixdorfer I'll let you know. It's pretty bizarre and doesn't seem as sought after as the more conventional vintage decks, so the price can be reasonable. Peter Endebrock has quite a collection - a little dangerous to see if you're trying to keep your white whale list short.
Worldwide Time Machine

"Cards from far off lands and bygone days!"
User avatar
dazzleguts
Moderator
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1491
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:32 pm
Country: Canada (ca)
Has thanked: 191 times
Been thanked: 132 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:20 pm  

A Waddingtons Double called " Royal Gothic".
first up the box lid,both colour backs and a joker.
IMG_0003.jpg

next the bottom of the box and two more jokers, each deck has three jokers.
IMG.jpg

I have not come across any info about the date on this set as of yet but still looking.
IMG_0001.jpg

I`m not too sure if the courts are actual historic figures?
IMG_0002.jpg

Thanks for looking and any information about this set is gratefully recieved. :D -Jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby dazzleguts » Thu Jun 26, 2014 4:38 pm  

Hello Jase. :) Here is the story of the fall of Dondorf.
There were actually 28 seperate colour printings to complete the faces and backs of this 1933 deck!
I remembered 12 but that was only for the backs. :shock:

The Deck That Broke A Card Factory's Back
With few exceptions, manufacturers of playing cards have been and are in the business for profit. Few have been collectors, and far too few have been imbued with deep idealism. A notable exception was the famous Dondorf family of Frankfurt-on-Main, Germany.

The Dondorf firm was founded in 1833, and in the 100 years of its existence produced possibly the finest playing cards ever manufactured. Any collector who has Dondorf cards in his or her collection can attest to their beauty and infinite variety.

On the occasion of the one hundredth anniversary of the firm in 1933, it was decided to mark the centennial by issuing a special deck to be presented as a souvenir honoring guests attending the ceremonies. These decks were not offered for sale on the German or any other market. The project was so lavish, the printing so complicated, and the costs so exorbitant, the firm never recovered. Instead it was forced into bankruptcy and was acquired by the Altenburger-Stralsunder Playing Card co. of Altenburg, Thuringia, now of Stuttgart, West Germany. Some 16 separate color printings were required for the court-cards, and 12 color printings for the backs of this unusual deck. A total of 28 separate color printings! Surely the pinnacle in the printing of playing cards was reached in this idealistic and ill-fated venture.

The deck is German in character throughout. While no definite personalities are depicted, one can see in the Kings the founders and rulers of old Germania. The Queens are all of noble mien, full of virtue and good works, pious and given to the gentle arts. The Jacks depict knights in various activities. The original backs show a page-boy and a Coat-of-Arms against a background of the Wartburg Castle. This Castle is connected in German history with Saint Elisabeth, Dr. Martin Luther, Walter von der Vogelweide, Wolfram von Escenbach, and Richard Wagner. In the background of each court-card may be seen figures reminiscent of German industry and handi-craft. These include ship-building and agriculture, the arts, religion, and the military.

It is unfortunate on the one hand that the 1933 anniversary of the firm coincided with an almost universal depression. Given normal times, who knows what other marvelous decks might have been issued by this family, dedicated as it was to the printing of beautiful and unusual cards. On the other hand it is reassuring to know that many of the Dondorf designs are still being printed by the present legal successor, the West German firm of Altenburger-Stralsunder, in Stuttgart. The director, Hans Reisig, is an avid collector and an authority on the history and development of playing cards.

One can imagine circumstances under which a playing card firm might become insolvent by printing inferior cards. This must be an almost isolated instance where a firm went into bankruptcy because of an ideal, and because of its refusal, despite the costs, to produce anything but the very best.


This article is from the web site of the 52 Plus Joker playing card collecting club.
From their publication "Clear The Decks" Volume XI, Number 3 - September 1997
The article first appeared in Hobbies magazine in 1960 and was written by Fred Taylor, an ardent collector, scholar and writer on a wide variety of playing card subjects.

*This deck can be found in the Fournier Catalogue: vol 1, pages 194/195, # 258 of Germanic Countries
Worldwide Time Machine

"Cards from far off lands and bygone days!"
User avatar
dazzleguts
Moderator
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1491
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:32 pm
Country: Canada (ca)
Has thanked: 191 times
Been thanked: 132 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sat Jun 28, 2014 1:35 am  

Thanks for the information Dazzelguts, :D you`re truly awesome.
After finding out the name of the deck i did a bit more digging and found some pictures of the ASS reprint,WOW those cards are really beautiful, i`m not too sure how many colours they used but a lot more than the 9 Waddington used, the pics are on pjmadsen.com
Here`s a double from Sobranie of London called "The Art of Erte"
100_0815.JPG

the cards come in a large laquered box. It has a small 150 page hardback book containing a biography of the life and works of Erte the tucks are plastic two part boxes and the cards are edged with gold.
IMG_0005.jpg

The Suits are repeating ,with only the Aces of each suit being different. Each pack has two jokers.
In 1982, Sobranie of London,the sponsors of the Sobranie Bridge Challenge, set out to produce a unique set of playing cards that would reflect the elegant,sophisticated image of their cigarettes.
One living artist perfectly personified that image both in himself and in his work, Romain De Tirtoff or " Erte ".
An artist whose life has been touched by the glitter of pre-revolutionary Russia,Fashionable Paris in the 1920`s and the Glamour of Hollywood.
IMG_0006.jpg

Erte agreed to the adaptation of a series of intricate designs for the numerals 1 - 10 that he had produced many years earlier and Sobraine commissioned him to produce the three court cards and joker to complete the pack.
At the age of 90 ,Erte was working as superbly as at any time in his life and the four new paintings blended immaculately with the existing numerals.
IMG_0004.jpg

Thanks for looking :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sat Jun 28, 2014 10:55 pm  

Jock1971 wrote:Thanks for the information Dazzelguts, :D you`re truly awesome.


:D :oops: :D

I've added PJ Madsen to the resources section of Worldwide. I don't think there is another good visual showing of the ASS deck anywhere else on the web.
Worldwide Time Machine

"Cards from far off lands and bygone days!"
User avatar
dazzleguts
Moderator
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1491
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:32 pm
Country: Canada (ca)
Has thanked: 191 times
Been thanked: 132 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:40 pm  

Thought i`d do some post`s with a few of my Antique British decks.May be of interest to show different courts by different manufacturers.
First up is Reynolds & sons who were producing cards from 1809 to 1902. This Ace is almost an exact copy of the old frizzle Ace that was abolished in 1862.Reynolds only had this one design (1862-1902) for their ace with a few variations this one has "& Sons" were as later packs this was replaced by "& Co" but both styles were used together simultaneously until their take over by Goodalls in 1884.
IMG_0010.jpg

IMG_0011.jpg


Next up a deck from James English who was producing cards from 1865 to 1905. James English used a variety of Aces and this one loosely based on the De La Rue Ace designed by Owen Jones dates from 1870 -1873 .
IMG_0012.jpg

IMG_0013.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
Last edited by Jock1971 on Tue Sep 06, 2016 2:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:43 pm  

Here`s a cool deck designed by Clare Mackie specially for the Folio Society ,dated 2010.
IMG_0018.jpg

IMG_0019.jpg

IMG_0020.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:59 pm  

Another couple of Antique British Decks.
First one is a goodalls who were producing decks from 1820 up til 1921 when they were taken over by De La Rue.
They had two different Ace designs that was used after the Old Frizzle was abolished. One was closely designed on the old frizzle and this design which was the more common and each had a few variations .this variation is dated 1867 to 1897 after which "Limd" & "Ltd" was added after the sons in the design.
IMG_0014.jpg

IMG_0015.jpg


Next up A deck from Willis & Co who were making cards from 1869 -1887. They only had one Ace possibly due to only producing cards for a short time. Willis did produce "Indicator" Packs from 1885-1887. And although they used the un-turned courts through-out their time, they did produce packs with turned courts (so all suit indicators were on the left hand side) from 1875.
IMG_0016.jpg

IMG_0017.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby dazzleguts » Mon Oct 06, 2014 4:26 pm  

Jase, can you explain what the Old Frizzle is? I'm guessing it refers to the tax on aces of spades?
Worldwide Time Machine

"Cards from far off lands and bygone days!"
User avatar
dazzleguts
Moderator
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1491
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:32 pm
Country: Canada (ca)
Has thanked: 191 times
Been thanked: 132 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Tue Oct 07, 2014 1:58 pm  

dazzleguts wrote:Jase, can you explain what the Old Frizzle is? I'm guessing it refers to the tax on aces of spades?

Hey there Dazzelguts :D . Yes your right in a way, to explain it more clearer here`s a brief history of Taxation of British cards. Please forgive me if i go all "School Teacher" :oops: :lol: :lol:
1711 - 1765
Recorded instances of tax on Playing cards go back to the late 1500`s, but from 1711 onwards the duty on a pack of cards started being exacted on the wrapping ,a hand stamp was used on a single card to show that the duty had been paid. This card was usually (But not always) the Ace of Spades as it was the top card of the pack.
1765 - 1828 The "Garter" Ace
Garter Ace.jpg
Garter Ace.jpg (65.86 KiB) Viewed 214 times

From 1765 Card makers were not allowed to print their own Ace of Spades instead the Tax Office began printing The Ace with a design that showed the duty had been paid (Again the duty was exacted from the wrappers) This Ace is Known as The "Garter" Ace due to the garter belt around the Ace . Forged Aces became a problem (even though it was a capitol crime punishable by death) as the tax on cards snowballed out of all preportions. Even at the initial rate of sixpence this was twelve times the price of the cheapest packs and by 1828 the tax had increased to thirty pence.
1828 - 1862 The "Old Frizzle" Ace
d01520sA3 (1).jpg
d01520sA3 (1).jpg (73.34 KiB) Viewed 929 times

In 1828 in order to defeat the evasion of tax, the duty on a pack of cards was reduced to one shilling (twelve pence). The security firm Perkins Bacon took over printing of the Ace from the tax office, using paper provided by the card makers. this Ace has become known as the "Old frizzle" because of its elaborate design.
From 1862 the duty was again reduced this time to Three pence and was charged on officially printed wrappers. The "Old Frizzle" was abolished and card makers were free to design and print their own Ace of Spades.
And in 1960 Tax on Playing cards was finally abolished.

Phew :roll: Hope that helps :D -Jase-
Last edited by Jock1971 on Tue Sep 06, 2016 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Tue Oct 07, 2014 2:11 pm  

Here`s another Folio society deck, This one is Called Odd Bods and is designed by Jonathan burton
IMG_0001.jpg

IMG_0002.jpg

IMG_0003.jpg
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Tue Oct 07, 2014 2:28 pm  

Here`s a couple more Old British decks
The first one being a De La Rue deck in all but name(Empire Card Co being a subsidiary of De La Rue). The Ace shown was used between 1880 up to around 1957 usually anonymous but sometimes with the Empire Card Co legend at the bottom.In 1880 De La Rue started using very small indexes,then moved onto medium size around 1890-1910, finally setteling on the size we are all used to from 1910 onwards. the indexes shown are the medium size dating 1890-1910.
IMG_0008.jpg

IMG_0007.jpg


Next pack is from makers Woolley & co who were producing cards from 1839 to 1910. They had two aces after the Old Frizzle ,this ace the more common of the two had a few variation and this variation dates the deck from 1880 to 1890.
IMG_0009.jpg

IMG_0010.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Tue Oct 07, 2014 2:36 pm  

Here`s a pack of Gordons Gin Playing Cards. i decided to show these as i think the courts are cool. And hopefully after showing these here, the pack may not be overlooked as just another advertising pack.
IMG_0004.jpg

IMG_0005.jpg

IMG_0006.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby volantangel » Tue Oct 07, 2014 7:50 pm  

Love the odd bods! Shelfed out a pretty penny for a pair of them a year ago, i think they are wayyy more expensive now
User avatar
volantangel
Moderator
Über member
Über member
 
Posts: 3606
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:06 am
Location: Singapore
Country: Singapore (sg)
Has thanked: 221 times
Been thanked: 309 times

Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Mon Nov 10, 2014 2:06 pm  

A limited Edition deck printed by Carta mundi of Belgium, the deck advertising John Players Special cigarettes is dated 1987 and is illustrated by Nick Price.
Box lid ,Back ,Extra card and Jokers.
IMG_0013.jpg

The Hearts and Spades.
IMG_0017.jpg

And last the Diamonds and Clubs.
IMG_0018.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jonnypowpow » Thu Nov 20, 2014 10:59 am  

Wow I had to have those Royal Gothic ones. Amazing thanks so much for posting man. I just picked up a set off ebay can't wait to see those. I'm in love with most of those antique sets you have as well they were a huge inspiration for my most recent deck. I only hope I can do them justice. What an awesome resource thanks so much for all the info and great pics man I love seeing decks like these.
User avatar
Jonnypowpow
✔ VERIFIED Designer
Apprentice
Apprentice
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2014 10:49 am
Location: Salt Lake City, Ut
Country: United States (us)
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 9 times

Re: England

Unread postby Jock1971 » Tue Jan 20, 2015 3:46 pm  

A couple more old English courts.
First up De La Rue.Known as the "Father" of Modern English Playing Cards, Thomas de la Rue began producing playing cards in 1832 and finished in 1969.This pack is dated 1865-1875,Due to the courts being unturned (De La Rue used turned courts from 1870 onwards) This Ace was designed by Owen jones (who began designing for DLR in 1844) was used straight after the "Old Frizzle" up until 1935 when the reference to Ireland was removed.
Owen jones also designed cards for the American company Lawrence and Cohen and this style Ace with his name on it can be found on their cards from 1865-1875.
IMG_0003.jpg

IMG_0004.jpg


Waddingtons began producing Playing cards in 1922. These courts are their first rather crude attempts which are an amalgamation of Goodalls & De la rue courts. Waddingtons quickly re-designed the courts in 1923 into what was to become their own standard courts.
IMG_0001.jpg

IMG_0002.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
User avatar
Jock1971
Member
Master
Master
 
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:00 pm
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
Has thanked: 128 times
Been thanked: 249 times

PreviousNext

Return to Worldwide Time Machine

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests