Japan

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Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:46 am  

Kurofuda (Black Cards)

This is a vintage deck made by Nintendo. It is a Mekuri pattern (four-suited deck) which developed in the 1700s. These cards take after the Tensho Karuta, the early Japanese paper cards which were modelled on the standard Portuguese pattern brought into the country in the mid 1500s. They used Portuguese playing cards as a base but obscured the images to avoid retribution from the government for using foreign cards. It was possible to be put to death for this offence.

Kurofuda cups coins.jpg
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Mekuri suits are of the Latin family: Koppu (Cups), Ôru (Coins), Isu (Swords) and Hau (Batons). In all mekuri patterns the court figures of Kings, cavaliers and knaves are extremely stylized and barely distinguishable, almost completely covered by heavy strokes of colour. The dragons of the Portuguese aces are so abstarct that they are no longer distinguishable at all (bottom right card of each suit).

Kurofuda swords batons.jpg
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This deck includes an Oni-fuda ("ogre card"), also called Kin-fuda ("golden card") which is often written on the small notice above the ogre's head. It is similar to a joker card and does not belong to any of the suits.

Kurofuda ogre.jpg
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Around the mid 1900s mekuri games became practically extinct, and the manufacturing of many patterns was discontinued within a couple of decades. The few decks now produced are considered to be for collectors or game historians.
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Thu Feb 20, 2014 1:19 am  

Skittles Fanning Deck (Fan Dack)
1972 design by magician Yutaka Kikuchi


This is another deck made by Nintendo, this time for the renowned magician Yutaka Kikuchi. Kikuchi was famous for developing a flame in hand trick, amoung others, and many of his devices are still being sold today.

Fan Dack fan.jpg


These playing cards are shaped like bowling pins and have artistically patterned backs for fanning displays. They could probably make spectacular fans in the right hands (not mine :? ).

Fan Dack ace back joker.jpg


The card faces are rather plain with no figures for the courts, only the letters K, Q, J, the suits signs and the usual stripes of bowling pins. The cards are 8" x 2.5", or 20.3 x 6.4 cm if you're metric.

Fan Dack box all.jpg


Fan Dack is (mis)printed on the side of the box so that is the name I usually use for them. I got the Skittles title from WWPCM
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Re: Japan

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sun Apr 06, 2014 5:03 pm  

A Deck from the Angel Playing Card Company based in Osaka Japan.
IMG_0011.jpg
Tuck Box
IMG_0011.jpg (55.21 KiB) Viewed 1590 times

This deck dates from 1978 but am not sure if mine are reprints of the original deck as i`ve found the same deck but with different colour backs on the world web playing card museum site .
IMG_0010.jpg
Extra Card,Jokers & Card Back
.
IMG_0012.jpg

Ukiyo-e litteraly means "Pictures of the floating world " and is a term for genre pictures that arose in the Edo period 1603-1867.Ukiyo-e was originally a buddhist term used to describe a misanthropic view of life and the mundane world,However in the laater parts of the 15th century it came to be used to descibe a carefree philosophy of life.
IMG_0013.jpg

A Great site to learn about Ukiyoe and playing cards can be found here kishorcards.tripod.com/07ukiyo/ukiyo1to9.htm. Thanks for looking :D
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Wed Apr 09, 2014 12:57 pm  

Cool J! I hadn't seen that tripod site before - that's an interesting article.
I'd like to add that the portraits on the grey backgrounds are all actors from traditional Japanese theater. I mention it because women weren't allowed in the profession so the female parts were played by men, which is why they are more homely than you'd expect.
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Re: Japan

Unread postby TGunitedcardists » Sun Aug 10, 2014 6:40 am  

Here's a run of the mill Nintendo deck. About 850 yen.
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-hearts-and-diamonds.jpg
hearts and diamonds
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Re: Japan

Unread postby Jock1971 » Mon Aug 11, 2014 12:45 pm  

Hi TGinitedcardists :D , Thanks for posting this deck, I`m curious to know a few things about Nintendo. i hope you can help. Is there any way you can date the decks ? I can`t see any codes etc and from what i`ve seen (not a lot :( )there are not many variations of the Ace of spades. ALso i see it came in a clear plastic tuck ,My 2 Angel decks came in clear plastic tucks are all the modern Japanese cards packed this way ?
I like the mermaid thingy Joker, :)
Oh.. 850 Yen is about £5 here and that seems a bit expensive for a standard deck :(
Thanks agin for showing the deck :D -jase-
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Re: Japan

Unread postby TGunitedcardists » Mon Aug 11, 2014 4:49 pm  

Jock1971 wrote:Hi TGinitedcardists :D , Thanks for posting this deck, I`m curious to know a few things about Nintendo. i hope you can help. Is there any way you can date the decks ? I can`t see any codes etc and from what i`ve seen (not a lot :( )there are not many variations of the Ace of spades. ALso i see it came in a clear plastic tuck ,My 2 Angel decks came in clear plastic tucks are all the modern Japanese cards packed this way ?
I like the mermaid thingy Joker, :)
Oh.. 850 Yen is about £5 here and that seems a bit expensive for a standard deck :(
Thanks agin for showing the deck :D -jase-


It's a new deck, nothing special. My guess the Nintendo deck is 1-3 years old.

Most people just use a Bicycle or Bee deck to play cards.

standard-bicycle-and-bee.jpg



Here is the ukiyo-e deck you posted in the shop, about 850 yen too.
standard-bicycle-riderbacks.jpg

ukiyo-e.jpg

Misc.jpg
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:43 pm  

I have seen the same basic Nintendo decks with interesting op-art backs.
That price seems pretty reasonable for an all plastic deck. Is Nintendo not making paper cards anymore? I have the Nintendo Club Platinum cards and they are plastic as well.
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Re: Japan

Unread postby TGunitedcardists » Sat Aug 16, 2014 7:16 am  

dazzleguts wrote:Is Nintendo not making paper cards anymore?


I don't know.
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sat Oct 03, 2015 9:43 pm  

Space
Vintage Hanafuda
possibly by Ohishi-Tengudo
exact age undetermined


**The double deck box these cards were sold to me in belongs to Ohishi-Tengudo, the oldest existing traditional card maker in Japan. The cards may be original to the box, or they might be replacements for the worn out originals. Both decks that were in the box are quite different from each other. One clearly is a Ohishi deck while the other, the one I am showing, has no make indicated on the Paulownia cards, where a makers mark can usually be found. The cards are a little dark with age and use.

Hanafuda ("Flower Cards") are beautiful playing cards, adorned with plants and animals, that became hugely popular in the Edo (1603-1867) period in Japan.

A deck consists of forty-eight cards divided into twelve suits of four cards each. The cards are small (5.3cm long x 3.3cm, 1 1/4" x 2 1/8"), made from stiff cardboard, and are beautifully illustrated. Each suit represents one of the twelve months of the year and shows individual plants, and some animals, that are associated with each month.

Here is an excellent website showing the different cards with their poetic and cultural associations.
http://namakajiri.net/nikki/the-flowers-of-hanafuda/


Hanafuda 1.jpg

The cards shown above are, from top row to bottom:
January – Pine (Matsu)
Pine with Crane * Red-lettered Tanzaku(ribbon of paper or thin wood) * Plain Pine (2 cards)

February – Plum (Ume)
Plum with Nightingale * Red-lettered Tanzaku * Plain Plum (2)

March – Cherry (Sakura)
Cherry with Curtain * Red-lettered Tanzaku * Plain Cherry (2)

April – Wisteria (Fuji)
Wisteria with Cuckoo * Solid Red Tanzaku * Plain Wisteria (2)


Game play:
These small stiff cards make a satisfying sound when thrown down onto a table during play, and use the "wash the deck" shuffle - being spread out face down on a table and mixed.

While the easiest strategy for scoring points is to match cards of the same suit, many Hanafuda games have special card combinations – or "yaku" – that will earn you point bonuses. I play the popular Koi Koi which is almost entirely made up of yaku. A few examples are:

"Viewing the Moon" -- Sake Cup card from the Chrysanthemum suit & Moon card from the Pampas suit

"Viewing the Cherry Blossoms" -- Sake Cup card from the Chrysanthemum suit & Curtain card from the cherry suit

"Viewing the Blossoms under the Moon" -- all 3 of the cards: Sake Cup card, Moon card & Cherry Blossom Curtain card

Apparently viewing things always requires some rice wine to keep it interesting :lol:


Hanafuda 2.jpg

These cards are:
May – Iris (Ayame)
Iris with Bridge * Solid Red Tanzaku * Plain Iris (2)

June – Peony (Botan)
Peony with Butterfly * Solid Blue Tanzaku * Plain Peony (2)

July – Clover (Hagi)
Clover with Wild Boar * Solid Red Tanzaku * Plain Clover (2)

August – Pampas (Susuki)
Pampas with Full Moon * Pampas with Geese * Plain Pampas (2)


Card structure:
The closest thing to cards in japan, before the Portuguese brought paper ones, were seashells that were painted and used to play matching games. So when paper cards were made in Japan they made them thick and hard like the shells, but rectangular like the Karuta of the Portuguese.

Most traditional Japanese card decks have a black, brown, or red border and back. The small cardboard cards are printed, then a piece of paper is glued to the back and folded over the edges of the card to form the border on the front. This frames the imagery and protects the edges of the cards. (In modern decks the borders and back are now often printed on the card stock with the card imagery)

A reason for the different colours of backs is that most serious players carry two or three decks to keep the game moving quickly. Having decks with different coloured backs and borders allows them to shuffle one deck, while the other is in play, without mixing the decks up or giving players an opportunity to cheat.


Hanafuda 3.jpg

These cards are:
September -- Chrysanthemum (Kiku)
Chrysanthemum with Sake Cup * Solid Blue Tanzaku * Plain Chrysanthemum (2)

October – Maple (Momiji)
Maple with Deer * Solid Blue Tanzaku * Plain Maple (2)

November – Willow (Yanagi)
Willow with Poet * Willow with Swallow * Willow with Solid Red Tanzaku * Rain and Lightning
**The poet on the willow card was a famous calligrapher whose name was Tofu.

December – Paulownia (Kiri)
Paulownia with Phoenix * Plain Paulownia (3 cards)


In Japan private gambling was illegal for centuries, but games themselves were not. When authorities would ban a type of card deck that was being used for gambling, someone would always come up with new cards, or a new game for existing cards, to get around the ban. This created a large variety of playing cards. Hanafuda were born during this cat and mouse game. Though not really suitable for gambling they were eventually used for it and banned like the rest.

About 120 years ago the Meiji government realized the futility of banning the cards and lifted the ban. Prime Minister Ito Hirobumi even commanded Ohishi to produce sets of flower cards in order to preserve the early flower karuta for future generations. With the ban lifted an entrepreneur called Yamauchi Fusajiro took the opportuinty to open a Hanafuda shop in Kyoto. His hand painted mulberry bark cards became so popular that the brand name of his cards, Nintendo, became synonymous with Hanafuda (and much later with video games).

Today special edition Hanafuda decks are often inhabited with pop culture characters or scenes. Cards can be found featuring anything from famous attractions of the city Kyoto to characters from Disney, with video game and anime editions being especially popular.


some sources I used:

http://www.studiokotokoto.com/2014/03/12/hanafuda-japanese-culture-in-a-deck-of-cards/
http://www.sloperama.com/hanafuda/koikoi.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanafuda
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Re: Japan (wap)

Unread postby BlueToy » Sat Oct 03, 2015 10:06 pm  

Any of you guys have Obake Karuta ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karuta )? They're kinda like the predecessors of Pokemon cards :D. They feature Japanese supernatural/mythological creatures.
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sat Oct 03, 2015 10:19 pm  


Some further information...


As with other playing card decks, not all Hanafuda decks are created equal. Often different grades of decks are indicated by their box art or wrappers, like the Napolean box of the Nintendo Kurofuda deck I posted earlier. Napolean was used to indicate Nintendo's top quality cards. Nintendo's medium quality decks feature Tengu (a demon with a long nose), and their cheaper novelty decks come in a wrapper with a simple nature scene.

This box has a gold label indicating it contained gold quality hanafuda cards made by Ohishi-Tengudo. They also made silver quality cards.
Hanafuda box.jpg
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Here are two vintage Hanafuda decks, with the same numbers of cards, but one deck is 4 cards thicker than the other. These 2 decks were found together in the Ohishi-Tengudo box shown above. The thicker deck may be original to the box and has Ohishi-Tenguda text, but the thinner one, which I used as the hanafuda example deck, is very different and has no Ohishi text.
Hanafuda stacks.jpg
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As in pasteboard cards, the quality is not necessarily in the thicker paper. The older (more used) thin deck seems higher quality than it's companion deck. The paper backing and border has been more thoroughly glued in place, and the cards remain flat while the thicker newer deck has bowed a little.


Here are sample cards from three different hanafuda decks:

The top one is a modern plastic Korean Hwa-tu Hanafuda deck that has 6 extra cards for Korean games. They are made by "Diamond Playing Cards" and the extra cards are basically ad cards for Diamond. I have 4 plastic Korean Hanafuda decks in total, all by different makers.
Hanafuda cards comparison.jpg


The second deck is a vintage deck with Nichiyu on the box. The only Nichiyu I have been able find in Japan is a forklift company, so either this was a kind of advertising deck, or the Nichiyu playing card company is no longer around. This red backed deck may be contemporary to the black one I featured in the Hanafuda posting, but I am still trying to determine ages. The booklet that came with it has no English and is missing it's cover.
Nichiyu logo.jpg
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The third and last vintage deck in the picture above is the thicker one of the 2 decks that came in the Ohishi-Tengudo box and is an Ohishi made deck.
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Re: Japan (wap)

Unread postby BlueToy » Sat Oct 03, 2015 10:30 pm  

The Tengudo deck looks really nicely packaged. The long-nosed mask is actually a depiction of a Tengu - a bird spirit/creature :)
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sat Oct 03, 2015 11:36 pm  

Sorry BlueToy, I was posting the additional information when you asked about the Obake Karuta.
Yes, I have seen them before, but I don't actually have any. I love those cards and have also seen many of the same fantastical creatures in prints reproduced in books. Do you know if the cards have ever been reproduced? I :drool: at the idea of finding a deck f those.

You seem familiar with the Tengu mythology, do you also play hanafuda?
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Re: Japan

Unread postby BlueToy » Sun Oct 04, 2015 7:33 am  

dazzleguts wrote:Sorry BlueToy, I was posting the additional information when you asked about the Obake Karuta.
Yes, I have seen them before, but I don't actually have any. I love those cards and have also seen many of the same fantastical creatures in prints reproduced in books. Do you know if the cards have ever been reproduced? I :drool: at the idea of finding a deck f those.

You seem familiar with the Tengu mythology, do you also play hanafuda?


I'm just slightly familiar with Japanese lower mythology and crafts because I've read books about them in the past. Plus I watched anime when I was a kid. Haha

As for the Obake cards (karuta is literally "cards" in Japanese), they seem to be called Yokai Cards nowadays (yokai and obake having similar meanings) and seem to still be in print. There is info in the last comment here:
https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/146144 ... ake-karuta.

Is anyone here based in Japan? Maybe s/he can give us more info on it. :)
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sat Jan 28, 2017 10:13 pm  

Space
Ainu
Published by Nintendo 1978/79
Designed by Tsumura Juntendo


There are 2 of these decks, each with different courts - one deck having the single figure courts shown here, the other having more traditional double ended courts and Ace of Spades. I like the grace of the single court drawings, but would like to find the double-ended ones as well. I found my deck at a thrift store, in a Nintendo black plastic case with a clear lid.

Ainu_Courts_small.jpg

The Ainu appearance and culture is very different from Japanese culture. In fact their language is unrelated to Japanese, or to any other language, and is considered a "language isolate". (Only 100 people are presently known to speak the language fluently.)

Ainu_spadespips_small.jpg
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Traditional dress, worn by all Ainu, was/is a robe spun from the inner bark of the elm tree, called attusi or attush. Both men and women wore ninkari - earrings. Women also wore matanpushi - embroidered headbands, various necklaces, and tattoos around their mouths and on their forearms.

Ainu_heartspips_small.jpg
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"Ainu" means "human" (also Aynu, and in Russian Ajny). The Ainu people regard things that are useful to them, or beyond their control, as containing "kamuy"(gods). One of the most important was Kim-un Kamuy, god of bears and mountains, and live bears were often kept in villages, which is why you see them here in the cards. Men wore a crown called "sapanpe" for important ceremonies. Sapanpe was made from wood fiber with bundles of partially shaved wood. This crown had wooden figures of animal gods, and other ornamentation, on its center.

Ainu_clubspips_small.jpg
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After a certain age boys would stop shaving and most men developed full beards and moustaches (though many modern Ainu are clean shaven to help them blend in better with the Japanese population). Men carried an emush (sword) secured by an "emush at" strap at the shoulders.

Ainu_diamondspips_small.jpg
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The Ainu originally lived in Russia mostly on Sakhalin Island and on the Kuril Islands, as well as on what became Hokkaido Island of Japan. With WW ll the Ainu and Japanese populations of Sakhalin and the North and South Kuril Islands were "repatriated" to Japan, though genetic testing has shown a relationship between the Ainu and the indigenous populations of Siberia and Mongolia, rather than with the Japanese.

They have only recently been officially recognized as indiginous people by the Japanese government (2008). The rather contented atmosphere of the cards belies the usual sad story of aboriginal people who were decimated by new diseases, violent conflict over land, and a continuing discrimination.

Ainu_jokersback_small.jpg

The largest population of Ainu was, and still is, on the island of Hokkaido. Hokkaido was known to the Ainu as Ainu Moshir, and was formally annexed by the Japanese in 1868, partly as a means of preventing the intrusion of the Russians, and partly for imperialist reasons.


Information for this posting came from:
http://www.wopc.co.uk/japan/ainu-culture
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ainu_people
http://www.ainu-museum.or.jp/en/study/eng01.html
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Re: Japan

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:37 pm  

Space
Tactics Supranational
By Nintendo c. 1980-82


This is the second of 2 decks, the first being called simply "Tactics". This deck has been referred to as "men's grooming playing cards" on the WOPC site, but I cannot find any source for that. Since they are made by Nintendo and have "Good luck, our members" and "TACTICS members" printed on the box I was inclined to think they had something to do with a Nintendo games club. But, looking at the first deck it has an alternate back and an ace of spades both printed with "Tactics Design". It remains a mystery. Sorry for the variance in colour from my poor old scanner. The first scan is too pink.

TacticsS_spadeshearts_small.jpg

The Tactics Supranational court cards have a suicide King and one-eyed Jack, but are otherwise a simplified modern design that reminds me of underground comics. I get a claustrophobic feeling from the way the heads of the courts are enclosed, and the lack of hands. They are probably designed by the same M. Nakajo who designed the other known Tactics Nintendo deck. The drawing style in the courts is very similar.

TacticsS_clubsdiamonds_small.jpg

There are actually 2 different jokers and my deck did not have any when I bought it. The one joker I have was acquired separately and it shows the alternate pale green colour this deck came in.


TacticsS_jokerbackpips_small.jpg


Information for this posting came from:
http://a.trionfi.eu/WWPCM/decks08/d06281/d06281.htm
http://www.wopc.co.uk/japan/index
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