Europe

Cards from far off lands and bygone days!

Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Mar 18, 2015 10:15 am  

A 1976 Reprint by the Danish National Museum of a deck by Christopher Ernst Susz from 1783.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: Europe

Unread postby dazzleguts » Wed Mar 18, 2015 7:04 pm  

Love that Schwyzer Fasnachts-jass deck. Is it from a festival Jase?
The actual costumes those images are based on must be quite freaky to see. I especially like the banner and characters for Goldmauder. :shock:
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:02 am  

Hiya Dazzelguts :D
Fasnacht is a type of Street Carnival, it is an old custom that is held between winter and spring, in the various regions of Schwyz (central Switzerland) this carnival developed into various form.The Card maker A.G. Muller of switzerland has produced many Fasnacht decks each quite different.
Here`s a link for more information about my pack and a couple of others by the same Artist (Leon Schnyder) http://www.karten-haus.ch/Grafik/KartenFasna.htm
Also Youtube have many videos showing scenes from various Fasnacht`s here`s alink to my favoritehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOwEKZamj34
-jase- :D
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sat May 02, 2015 7:04 am  

The Cartoonist Pack, Made by Carta Mundi dated 1980.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Slavich » Sat May 02, 2015 10:09 am  

Jock1971 wrote:The Cartoonist Pack, Made by Carta Mundi dated 1980.
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Hearts.jpg

Clubs.jpg

Diamonds.jpg

Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-


I love this deck. Bought one a couple of weeks ago :)

Thanks for posting the pics.
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Re: Europe

Unread postby DragonSoul » Sat May 16, 2015 8:34 pm  

I just ran across something a bit puzzling. I acquired the Piatnik Shakespeare set with sealed decks this week and noticed that there is a slight color difference between the two decks. One of the decks has numbers on the Ace of Spades and the other doesn't. But, the biggest thing is that one deck seems to be thicker than the other. At first I thought it was because it is more warped than the other but, it's something you can actually feel when you align the center (straightest) parts together. Thoughts???
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed May 20, 2015 6:42 pm  

DragonSoul wrote:I just ran across something a bit puzzling. I acquired the Piatnik Shakespeare set with sealed decks this week and noticed that there is a slight color difference between the two decks. One of the decks has numbers on the Ace of Spades and the other doesn't. But, the biggest thing is that one deck seems to be thicker than the other. At first I thought it was because it is more warped than the other but, it's something you can actually feel when you align the center (straightest) parts together. Thoughts???


Hiya DragonSoul.
i checked my pack of these and the numbers were on both Aces ,so i checked all my Piatnik boxes and both sets in every box-set have numbers on (although 90% of the numbers appear on the Ace of Hearts).
There are none of the other differences in my set that you mentioned either so am not sure of why there are any colour or even thickness difference between your sets, maybe they are from different editions or print runs and were just grouped together for this set ?
Sorry i couldn`t help in explaining the mystery
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Re: Europe

Unread postby dazzleguts » Wed May 20, 2015 11:18 pm  

The whiter, thicker deck also seems to have more irregular corners.

I think Jase is right about your decks being from different print runs. I have a Kem double deck set where the codes on the aces of the 2 decks actually give different printing years. Having stockpiles of cards printed, waiting to go into boxes, was common amoung the various card companies, and many collectors have commented on their own Kem doubles being the same.

My own Shakespeare set, in a box like yours with no barcode, has numbers on the Ace of Spades of both decks, and the other Piatnik sets I have all have the numbers on the Ace of Hearts, from the older decks to the ones that have a website on the box. It may be that they were bringing the Shakespeare decks into line with their other designs in having the numbers on the Heart rather than Spade ace, and yours is a crossover set. A different print run with new card stock too. (A change in ownership or leadership often leads to changes like this in the cards.)

If you are going to open them you could check the second deck to see if the Heart has the numbers.
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Re: Europe

Unread postby DragonSoul » Thu May 21, 2015 8:46 pm  

Thanks for the info! That they might have been from 2 print runs was my first guess as well. I just wasn't sure if the difference in numbers might be an indicator of different years. Now I'm tempted to open the one without numbers to see if they are on the Ace of Hearts but, I don't think I will juuust yet. ;)
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sat May 23, 2015 5:33 am  

A couple of Fortune Telling decks from Piatnik to show.
The first is a 36 card deck titled Gypsy Fortune telling cards No.1901
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Little as we know about the history of playing cards, we have even less historical evidence to shed light on the origins of cartomancy. what we can say with some degree of certainty is that the first reference to fortune-telling by cards is contained in the "Mainzer Losbuch" which was printed by Johann Schoffler between 1505 and 1510.
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It seems probable ,then, that playing cards were used for the purposes of fortune telling more or less from their first appearance in Europe, the earliest playing cards were associated with adages which point to a cartomantic context. The heyday of fortune-telling cards came in the 18th century and coincided with the age of enlightenment. It was during this period that the traditions of the magic circles and the revival of interest in alchemy emerged in the form which they have largely retained to the present day.
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Here`s the 32 card deck titled "le jeu Destin Antique" paitnik No.1944.
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sat May 23, 2015 5:37 am  

And here`s the cards from "Le Jeu Destin Antique"
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: Europe

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sat May 23, 2015 11:29 pm  

Are these both regular card sized Jase?
The Jeu du Destin remind me of The Book of Destiny by Grimaud, except more elegent. Perhaps Grimaud based theirs on the original Destin deck. The Grimaud deck is oversize at 7.7 cm x 11.5 cm.
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sun May 24, 2015 2:13 am  

hi Dazzelguts. :D
the card size is 58mm x 89mm .
i got these from a seller in Hungary,(he has the Tarot size as well) here`s a link to his page, some good deals and he does free shipping. i got these within 3 days of ordering which is very fast.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/card0holder?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2754

jase :D
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Re: Europe

Unread postby dazzleguts » Sun May 24, 2015 4:03 pm  

Wow, 3 days!
Did it land on your doorstep with a little parachute attached?
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Thu Jul 16, 2015 9:13 am  

Basler Fasnachtskarten by A.G. Muller of switzerland.
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The Fasnacht Festival is a type of street carnival which developed into different forms dependent on the region of switzerland your in. This pack was designed by Robert Hiltbrand for the 1984 Basler region Fasnacht carnival.
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A.G Muller have produced many Fasnacht Playing cards, See the Schwyzer Fasnachts-jass pack on Page 2.
Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Thu Jul 23, 2015 5:01 am  

Jugendstil Art Nouveau by Piatnik No.2136, dated 1980.
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Adapted to a bridge set from a Tarot deck titled "Tarok No.1" designed by Ditha Moser that was published by Joseph Glanz & Albert Berger of Austria in 1906.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sat Jul 25, 2015 7:37 am  

DAS SPIEL DER MACHTIGEN Der Turkenkrieg von 1683
Piatnik Edition Number 2860, Dated 1983. Box dimensions 160mm x 230mm, Card dimensions 60mm x 104mm

This set of playing cards displaying motifs connected with the Turkish wars and the siege of Vienna in 1683 is owned by the Historical Museum of the City of Vienna. Most of the cards bear illustrations which allude generally to the wars against the Ottaman Empire in the second half of the 17th century, while a few refer directly to the events of the summer of 1683, when Vienna was besieged for 60 days.
In the wake of the decisive battle on September 12th 1683, which lifted the siege and changed the course of history for European Christendom, a veritable flood of illustrations appeared depicting the events and the principal personalities involved. Of extremely variable artistic quality, these graphic works were frequently copied and formed the basis for numerous oil paintings, It is in the context of this popular illustrative material that this set of playing cards should be seen.
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Whoever created this set of cards left us no hint as to their identity. None of the 35 cards bears a monogram or other designation, and on the basis of the available evidence it seems that the missing card (the Grape 10) also contains no clue.
A comparison with other playing cards illustrating political themes suggest that the present set dates from soon after 1683. The absence of explanatory texts supposes that the purchaser was still familiar with the events and their background. The possible error on the card depicting the Elector of the Palatinate could point to the year 1685 or shortly thereafter (See the Jack cards). It is highly unlikely that the cards date from later than 1699, because the peace of Karlowitz concluded in that year made the picture of Europe`s political life as portrayed on the cards out of date.
As for the place of origin, some evidence speaks for Vienna, although on the whole Nuremberg is more probable. But this is a field where much research remains to be done and there is little evidence to go on.

THE PLAYING CARDS - Europe in 1683 and its diplomacy
Anybody in the late 17th century who took an interest in political affairs will have been familiar with the geopolitical categories exemplified in the arrangement of the card illustrations, which survey the European diplomatic scene in 1683. The Christian sovereigns of Europe confront the rulers of the East, with the German Electors on the next rung below. As the artist proceeds numerically from highest to lowest cards, so he narrows his horizon progressively.
At one level, then,the hierarchical arrangement is expressed in the numerical order of the cards. Yet there is an implied hierarchy within the suits as well. The foremost place is occupied by the Hearts, followed by Spaddes and the suit symbols Grape and Pomegranate - this latter with its red colour and many seeds symbolizing both life and death.Seen as a whole, the set in its right sequence presents a detailed picture of the times, a glimpse behind the scenes of the siege of Vienna in 1683.

The most powerful rulers of the age appear as Kings. Hearts - Leopold I , Holy Roman Emperor, Spades - Louis XIV of France, Grape - Charles II of Spain, Pomegranate - Karl XI of Sweden.
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One of the recurrent themes of European history in the 17th century was undoubtedly the rivalry between Louis XIV and the Habsburgs. The Spanish branch of the Habsburg dynasty maintained close ties with the court in Vienna, and with France as a common antagonist Madrid tightened its links with Leopold I even further. Since the peace of Westphalia Sweden had emerged as a major power in Europe, although it was hardly affected by the Turkish threat.
The military campaigns of Louis XIV were in a sense the prelude to the great Turkish wars. The events on the Rhine left Leopold little freedom of action, and two diplomatic cliques at the Viennese court vied for the Emperor`s support: the "western camp" sought the formation of an alliance with France, while the "eastern camp" argued that Constantinople was the greater threat and that peace should be concluded with France in order to leave the Emperor free to deal with the Hungarian rebels and the Ottoman Empire. It was not until Kara Mustapha had led his army out of Belgrade on the road to Vienna-in the spring of 1683-that the eastern caamp gained the upper hand.

While the four Kings depict the foremost European powers, the Aces represent - at least from a contemporary vantage point - the world of oriental politics. Hearts - Sultan Mehmed IV of Turkey, Spades - Suleiman, Emperor of Persia, Grape - Peter the Great of Russia, Pomegranate - Murad Girey, Khan of the Tartars.
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Just as the Holy Roman Emperor was forced to defend two fronts, in the West and in the East, so Constantinople had to diversify its military resources, to deal with Hungary and the politically unstable regions on the Polish and Russian borders and at the same time to meet the threat of Persia, which had become the bastion of the Shiite Moslem faith and was thus opposed to the Sunni Turks.
In the course of the 17th century Russia became a major power and, by constantly seeking to expand southwards, found a natural enemy in Turkey. Between the two nations lay the Crimean Tartars, whose Khan had been vassal of Constantinople since 1475. As allies of the Ottoman Empire, the Tartars played an ambiguous role in the campaign against Vienna. Khan Murad Girey was the only military commander in the invading army who opposed a direct attack on the city of the Habsburgs. As greatly feared warriors, the Tartars would have made a valuable contribution to Kara Mustapha`s military effort, but they failed to join in the fighting. After the Turkish army had been beaten back, Khan Murad Girey was deposed by Kara Mustapha.

The major nations on the periphery of Europe - with the exception of Sweden and Russia - are depicted on the Queen cards. Hearts - Jan III Sobieski of Poland, Spades - Christian V of Denmark, Grape - Charles II of England, Pomegranate - Peter II of Portugal.
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England, Denmark and Portugal all failed to take sides. Portugal had only gained its independence from Spain as recently as 1668 and was backing France in its confrontation with Madrid. In response to an appeal by Pope Innocence XI Portugal made a financial contribution to the Turkish wars, as did Spain and the Italian states.
Denmark was preoccupied with the problem of containing Sweden`s expansionist tendencies. In February 1683 it was induced by Paris to enter an alliance whose purpose was to end the conflict between France and the Holy Roman Empire.
The situation was extremely confused in London, where diplomatic offensives of France and the Habsburgs clashed full force. While public opinion was incensed at the French attack on Luxembourg in 1682, Charles II continued to support France and sought to act as a mediator in continental politics.
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Sat Jul 25, 2015 8:53 am  

The Jacks represent the German Elector, omitting those of the ecclesiastical Electorates and the Electorship of Bohemia. Hearts - Elector Maximilian II Emanuel of Bavaria, Spades - Elector Johann Georg of Saxony, Grape - Elector Friedrich Wilhelm of Brandenburg, Pomegranate - Elector Karl of the Palatinate.
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On January 26th 1683 Leopold and Maximilian II Emanuel had concluded a defensive alliance, by the terms of which the Bavarian Elector undertook to supply some 8,000 troops if the border was threatened. In the event the Bavarian contingent was reinforced by 1,000 men from Salzburg. Saxony provided another 9,000, and Franconia and Swabia sent the same number. With the 21,000 soldiers of the Imperial army, the Polish forces of the same strenght and several smaller contingents, the relieving army must have numbered over 70,000.
Brandenburg did not follow the example of Bavaria and Saxony. Elector Friedrich Wilhelm was more interested in Swedish possessions in North Germany.
The inclusion of the Elector of the Palatinate in the set of playing cards ia an error on the part of the artist. The man who actually led a battalion of troops from the Palatinate into battle in 1683 was Philipp Wilhelm of the House of Pfalz-Neuburg, who did not succeed to the Electorship of the Palatinate until two years later.

The theme linking the 10`s cannot be fully ascertained because the Grape card is missing, It is possible to reconstruct with some plausibility the illustration of the 10 Grape card, it probably depicted an allegorical figure with the Venetian coat of arms. Hearts - the Kingdom of Hungary, Spades - the Kingdom of Bohemia, Grape - Missing (Venice), Pomergranate - Holland.
The Kingdom of Hungary was the focal point of the events which led up to the war of 1683. Constantinople`s demand that a number of border fortresses be surrendered in return for a prolongation of the peace together with the repeated Habsburg claim to the Kingdom were the immediate causes of the Turkish campaign.
The disputed claims of both Empires to Hungary went back to 1526, when Ludwig II, King of Hungary and Bohemia, lost his life against the Turks. His successor was a Habsburg, who ascended the Bohemian throne in the same year. But after fresh Turkish incursions into Hungary in 1529, the Habsburgs controlled only the western half of the country.

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The 9`s depict four of the military commanders in the allied army. Hearts - the Duke of Lorraine, Spades - the Prince of Waldeck, Grape - the Prince of Bayreuth, Pomergranate - General Dunewald.
Duke Karl of Lorraine was entrusted by Leopold with the overall command of the army in 1683. By a series of judicious tactical moves in thearea around Vienna he laid the groundwork for the final battle which lifted the siege, although the Polish King assumed supreme command of the allied forces during that battle.
Georg Friedrich Prince of Waldeck was rewarded for his successes on the diplomatic front by being given responsibility for drawing up the allied army. During the battle for Vienna he commanded the centre. General Johann Heinrich Count Dunewald enjoyed a reputation as one of the best commanders in the Imperial army. In the final battle to lift the siege he was in charge of the right flank, under Waldeck, while the left flank was commanded by the Franconian General Christian Ernst Margrave of Bayreuth.

The 8`s comprise three eastern European territories incorporated in the Ottoman Empire, and Switzerland, which was not in any way involvbed in the Turkish war and thus needs no Further explanation. Hearts - Abbafi in Transylvania, Spades - Cossacks, Grape - Moldavians and Wallachians, Pomergranate - Switzerland.
Wallachia, Moldavia and Transylvania were principalities which had acquired a considerable degree of autonomy despite being incorporated in the Ottoman Empire. As vassal states they duly sent contingents of troops to join the Turkish army, although these were employed primarily in bridge building.
There is no firm evidence to prove that Cossacks took part in the battle for Vienna, although they were inevitably drawn into virtually every conflict between their neighbours -the Mongolians,Poles,Russians and Turks.

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The 7`s portray the siege of Vienna itself, with the city and the Turkish camp depicted on the Spade card. Hearts - Ernst Rudiger Count von Starhemberg, Spades the City of Vienna (Mayor Johann Anders von Liebenberg), Grape - Grand Vesir Kara Mustapha, Pomegranate - Emmerich Count Thokoly.
What Lotheringen as commander-in-chief of the army achieved outside the city, Count Starhemberg equalled within the walls of vienna. As commander of the defending forces he supervised the strengthening and manning of the ramparts and did much to raise the morale of the city`s inhabitants.
Kara Mustaphas Pasha was appointed Grand Vesir in 1676 and sought to surmount the internal problems of the Ottoman Empire by waging successful military campaigns abroad. He is reported to have fought courageously during the battle, but after his defeat he was dismissed by the Sultan and strangled in December of the same year.
The Hungarian Count Emmerich Thokoly, who commanded a contingent of rebel soldiers, contributed significantly to detemining the course of events in 1683 as much by what he failed to do as by anything he did. Although nominally offering his support to the Turks, he also negotiated with the Habsburg court to keep his options open. In battle he consistently withdrew before engaging the enemy, and at decisive moments, when the Turkish forces relied on his arrival, he failed to appear.

The 6`s illustrate typical representations of the four estates of 17th century society. Hearts - Priest (the clergy), Spades - nobleman (the aristocracy), Grape - burgher (the middle class0, Pomegranate - farmer (the peasantry).
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A clearly differentiated hierarchial order was a feature of social attitudes in past centuries, reflected here in the sequence of the card suits. The foremost position -Hearts- is allotted to the clergy which enjoyed immense influence not only as a landowner but also as an indispensable element in court life in the subtle power politics of 17th century Europe.
The nobility did not constitute a homogeneous group but comprised several strata : the landed gentry, the hereditary aristocracy and those who had been ennobled for services rendered to the Imperial household.
With the emergence of Vienna as the sole residence of the Habsburgs in the 17th century, far-reaching changes took place in the social order of urban life, as the middle class citizens were forced to move to the outlying suburbs by the up-and-coming class of the nobility and the court officials.
Except in Tyrol and Vorarlberg, the peasantry in the crown territories had no representation of their own. It was the function of their manorial lords - the gentry, aristocracy and clergy - to uphold their interests.

Thanks for looking at my crds :D -jase-
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Wed Jul 29, 2015 11:41 am  

A reproduction of an Hungarian deck titled "Ibusz", printed by editiones del prado in 2004 and produced by the Fournier Playing card museum from the original pack in their collection.
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I don`t really know much about these cards except that they were originally printed in 1965 by the "Playing card factory and printing house" of Budapest, Hungary.
The court cards depict scenes from Hungarian Folklore with the figures wearing typical costumes of the country ,while the Aces are decorated with emblems denoting Hunting, Fishing, Agriculture and music.
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Thanks for looking at my cards :D -jase-
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Re: Europe

Unread postby Jock1971 » Thu Jul 30, 2015 9:47 am  

BOTANISCHES KARTENSPIEL von J.H. LOSCHENKOHL

Number limited edition by Piatnik dated 1979. The origin and date of the original pack is indicated by the handwritten inscription:"bey Loschenkohl in Wien 1806" on the Ace of Clubs, which also bears the firms stamp. The handwritten "M" on the Queen and Jack of Spades is the initial of Mayer, one of Loschenkohl`s craftsmen.
52 Cards in French suits ,Hand-coloured copper engravings with dimensions of 86mm x 57mm .
The 46 coloured cards are from the library and folio collection of the Austrian Museum of Applied Art, and the uncoloured cards are from the complete pack in the Cincinnati Art Museum.
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There are very few examples of the packs of cards which received such wide publicity shortly before Loschenkohl`s death. A note in the inventory of his estate reads : "Since legal objections had been raised against Loschenkohl`s cards by other Viennese playing card manufacturers and their sale consequently forbidden by the terms of a magistate`s decision dated August 14th 1806, and since, in view of Loschenkohl`s death, his appeal to the government dated September 27th 1806 remains unsettled, it is incumbent upon the purchaser to pursue this case, all documents pertaining to which are contained in this lot"
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It may well have been Loschenkohl`s legal quarrel with other card manufacturers about what for him at least, to judge by the price, was a very special pack of cards, that led to so few copies surviving. Reasearchers are aware of the existence today of only three packs. The colouring of the one in the Museum of Applied Art in Vienna probably makes it the most attractive one, despite the fact that it is incomplete. It was registered only recently in the catalogue of the museum library`s folio collection under the heading "Old Stock", which clearly shows that it had been in the museums possession for some time.
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It is to be assumed that it was originally contained in some kind of attractive presentation box and that because of the box it was placed in the care of some department other than the library or folio collection. The cataloguing system of the day was unfortunately only superficial and affords no further information. It may be that this particular pack was part of a bequest to the museum from an aristocratic family.
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